By: Georgia Coats

We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity…   Preamble to the Constitution of the United States

 

I can usually spot negative and hate speech coming from one group against another by the signature word they.  “They don’t belong here.” “They do things differently.”  “Why do they ________ like that?”

 

For Spring Break my Greek Immigrant parents came from sunny Colorado to visit my home in soggy Dearborn.  They did all the fun spoiling that any Yiayia and Papou would do with their grandkids.  Amidst all the excitement, I invited my parents to come with me to spend some time with Zuzu, my Kurdish-Syrian New American friend.  I had met her last October, at a free community event sponsored by Sabeel Media at the Dearborn Heights library, discussing the responsibility of the media to share the experiences and needs of refugees.  That event inspired me to “scooch over,” and make a little room in my life for the refugee crisis that faces us all as human beings.  I am also regularly challenged by the command of Jesus the Messiah to love God with all my heart, soul, mind and strength; and to love my neighbors as myself.  I have been visiting with Zuzu weekly for the last six months and she has taught me so much about friendship and hardship and Arabic and Kurdish.  In turn, I have taught her about American systems, and phone systems, and English words.  She calls me her teacher, but I call her my friend.  Through it all we have become tied to each other.

 

“There is so much political rhetoric for and against the topic of refugees, but to actually sit and sip tea with a neighbor who happens to be one seemed like a novel idea.” 

 

My parents were eager to meet Zuzu and her family.  There is so much political rhetoric for and against the topic of refugees, but to actually sit and sip tea with a neighbor who happens to fit that category seemed like an interesting and novel idea.  Before our visit, I prepped my parents on who to shake hands with or not shake hands with, where to put shoes, and how to sit on low couches—even with my dad’s recently replaced knees.

 

Kids

 

Zuzu warmly opened her modest upper flat to my parents and my three kids on a rainy March afternoon.  We sipped little cups of rich black tea with as much sugar as my kids wanted.  We touched on topics of politics, dictators, and dialects as we observed Kurdish television rattling on in the background.  We shared a lot in common.  Our little visit brought back some nostalgic memories for my mom, of the way visits used to be for her as a child, when people shared simple but special moments together in each other’s homes.  The TV rattling news in the background was normal for my dad—only his gets all the best Greek stations.

 

There was a pause in our conversation, which gave Zuzu a moment to form a question in English.  She asked my father if he left Greece because he was a refugee.  He shook his head “No,” but then proceeded to explain in short sentences that his Greek village was ravaged in World War II, and that his parents were killed.  Years later, he immigrated to the U.S. in search of a better life.  The look on Zuzu’s face was full of compassion and understanding as she responded to the look of great loss on my dad’s face.  Different generations.  Different countries.  Different wars.  Different dictators.  But for a moment, Zuzu and my dad were ushered into the same horrible club of loss, tragedy and destruction by war.  It’s a large club that no one wants to join, but many are forced into its membership.  As I sat and observed this unintended “we” moment between my father and Zuzu, I said a silent prayer for her young children.  I am a product of my dad’s hope for a better life in a new land.  Maybe our family gives Zuzu perspective on what things might look like for her young children as they grow up to call this new land their home.  At least for now.  I know deep down, Zuzu really hopes to take her children back to her home country of Syria in better times, Inshallah, God-willing.

 

MomDad

 

As we said our good-byes, I thanked God for this incredible moment to share with my family and my neighbor.  We are blessed.  We enjoyed each other’s company.  Our human hearts beat the same, and by unintended circumstances, we had more in common than we imagined.  We, the people, who long for justice and tranquility in a more perfect Union.

 

“We had more in common than we imagined.  We, the people, who long for justice and tranquility in a more perfect Union.”